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How was Guatemala 2017: Medical Clinics

How was Guatemala 2017: Medical Clinics

This year’s medical clinics were the largest yet. The team saw 483 patients, dispensed 126 pairs of reading glasses and filled 1563 prescriptions. We operated clinics with two physician stations supported by two pharmacy stations and about a dozen helpers running blood pressure and temperature stations, doing vision screenings and checking people in and out. Before and after clinic, we spent hours packaging medicines, counting and restocking supplies. People showed up to clinic wanting to see a doctor because they felt bad. Usually their ailments were simply a component of the lives they lead of hard manual labor, little food and water, and unsanitary living conditions. We did what we could to alleviate their suffering and show we cared about them. For most of those we treated, more serious medical issues will simply result in death. They lack the resources from education to transportation to phones to have a better outcome. We are fortunate to live where health care options for most of us are far superior. As recent events in our family demonstrated, while our grandsons did not survive birth, our daughter-in-law did. In the villages where we ran our clinics, most likely the mom would have died too. Seeing first-hand the lack of medical options in Guatemala is why we’ve established the scholarship in memory of our grandsons. It is our hope that in time, the recipient graduates of the school supported by our non-profit Matthew2540 can by furthering their education in the field of health, make their communities healthier and bad medical outcomes less likely.

Mission Partners

  • Holy Trinity Lutheran Church: Knowing, Loving and Sharing Christ
    Holy Trinity Lutheran Church: Knowing, Loving and Sharing Christ